AERO World Language
Standards

World Language Standards
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Learning languages other than one’s own mother or heritage language provides wide ranging benefits to the individual learner, as well as the school’s overall, interdisciplinary curriculum. Learning and critical thinking skills attained in other language learning directly and positively impact learning in other content areas and lifelong learning. Language awareness gained in learning additional languages improves understanding of language in general, including one’s own mother/heritage language. Topics and units in foreign language classes co-teach, re-teach and can help pre-teach skills, topics, and units in other content areas. Language teachers can best attain the standards and benchmarks in the foreign language curriculum and co-teach units and themes in other content areas when they are fully engaged as members of interdisciplinary planning and curricular teams.

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Impact of Daily Foreign or Additional Language Learning**

a. Languages, both mother tongue and foreign, are best learned with daily instruction. Critical thinking and learning habits attained as a result of foreign language learning support learning in other content areas, and are skills needed for lifelong learning.

b. Foreign (non-heritage) language learning correlates positively with success in other content areas, and promotes an interdisciplinary view of the curriculum.

c. Brain scans and MRI test show that foreign language learning increases brain activity levels dramatically.

d. Research supports the positive impact of second language learning on learning additional languages, learning one’s heritage language, and understanding language in general.

e. Consistent, daily PK-12 language learning provides the time and experience needed to fully attain complex learning, language, communication and culture skills listed in the PK-12 standards and benchmarks document.

f. Interdisciplinary units and themes, supported by both classroom teachers and foreign language and other specialists, lead to greater learning and understanding than units taught solely in either (one) classroom setting. Many of the broader themes (e.g. environment, history, peace studies) addressed in core subjects take on greater understanding when viewed from the perspective of other cultures presented in foreign language learning.

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Impact of Less than Daily and Less than PK-12 Additional Language Learning**

a. Anything less than daily instruction will lead to diminished language attainment, and diminished learning skill attainment, which in turn diminishes the positive impact on interdisciplinary and lifelong learning.

b. Students beginning foreign language learning later in the PK-12 sequence of study, without benefit of knowledge gained in earlier instruction, may not be able to achieve the highest level of benchmarks if they do not have immersion-type experiences. They will not be able to develop all four strands adequately; that is, they will have to develop the communication strand at the expense of the other strands and thus will lose some of the benefit of interdisciplinary teaching and cultural awareness.

c. Compacting or condensing the scope and sequence adversely impacts students’ acquisition of the PK-12 language outcomes, as well as the development of students’ critical thinking and lifelong learning skills. It diminishes students’ opportunity to have the range of experiences and learning of a full PK-12 program.



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The AERO/NESA Foreign Language Standards and Benchmarks

a. The AERO/NESA document assumes daily foreign language instruction and provides a PK-12 road map leading to the grade 12 outcomes. It assumes daily contact with the language for at least 20-30 minutes daily from PK through 3 and at least 35-45 minutes from grades 4-12.

b. The document is designed to be used as the basis for the development or refinement of an individual school’s standards and benchmarks for students in a foreign language (non-native, non-heritage) program.

c. The AERO/NESA document can be further used to help align a later-entering language learner (e.g., transfer student or student wishing to learn additional foreign languages) with appropriate standards and benchmarks, as well as targeting realistic outcomes following a shorter than PK-12 program.

d. The document’s preface and philosophy can be used to refine an individual school’s mission, philosophy and goal statements to include additional language learning.

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1.
COMMUNICATION

"Communication can be characterized in many different ways. The approach suggested within this document is to recognize three communicative modes that place primary emphasis on communication (Brecht and Walton 1994). The three modes are: (1) Interpersonal, (2) Interpretive, and (3) Presentational. Each mode involves a particular link between language and the underlying culture that is developed gradually over time.”*

The Interpersonal Mode:
"The interpersonal mode is characterized by active negotiation of meaning among individuals. Participants observe and monitor one another to see how their meanings and intentions are being communicated. Adjustments and clarifications can be made accordingly. The Interpersonal Mode is most obvious in conversation, but both the interpersonal and negotiated dimensions can be realized through reading and writing, such as exchange of personal letters or of electronic mail messages.”*

1.1 Students will converse, provide and obtain information, express feelings, emotions, and ideas, and exchange opinions in the target language.

By the end of grade 2 students will:

a. Understand and use basic age-appropriate courtesy expressions and gestures, and make age-appropriate introductions, presenting classmates, family members, and friends.

b. Ask and answer simple questions related to familiar and age-appropriate topics (family, school, daily routines and events, familiar objects and possessions, animals, food, clothing, celebrations…).

c. Express needs, interests, likes and dislikes in brief conversations.

d. Express feelings and emotions in simple phrases.

e. Express basic agreement and disagreement.


By the end of grade 5 students will:


a. Perform greetings, leave-takings, and common classroom interactions using culturally appropriate gestures and oral expressions.

b. Give and follow simple instructions as part of age-appropriate classroom or cultural activities or both.

c. Ask and answer questions about familiar topics such as school events, celebrations, personal opinions, and family, orally and in guided writing.

d. Exchange descriptions of people, places, events, and products of the culture (such as toys, clothing, foods, types of dwellings, monuments) with each other and with the class as a group.

e. Exchange likes and dislikes, feelings and emotions, in familiar contexts or about favorite objects through discussions, interviews, etc.

f. Engage in everyday situations (such as buying, ordering, shopping, transportation, etc.) through role play.

g. Extend, accept, and refuse invitations.

h. Use expressions such as showing interest, asking for clarification, and checking comprehension for managing conversations.

By the end of grade 8 students will:


a. Follow and give multi-step directions for participating in age-appropriate cultural activities and investigating the function of products of the foreign culture.

b. Ask and respond to questions for clarification, orally or in writing.

c. Exchange detailed information and compare, contrast, and express opinions and preferences about personal events, memorable experiences, school subjects, and feelings and emotions, with peers or members of the target cultures, both orally and in writing.

d. Use the target language to acquire goods, services, or information orally and in writing.

e. Discuss orally school and community issues and problems.

f. Extend, accept, and refuse formal and informal invitations, using expressions and behaviors appropriate to varied situations.

By the end of grade 12 students will:


a. Initiate, develop, discuss, and present orally or in writing solutions to important issues and problems of the target cultures.

b. Exchange, support, and discuss opinions with fluid use of language on a variety of topics dealing with contemporary and historical issues.

c. Describe and justify states of being and feelings.

d. Engage in authentic communication during visits, field trips, community service activities, etc.

The Interpretive Mode:
“The Interpretive Mode is focused on the appropriate cultural interpretation of meanings that occur in written and spoken form where there is no recourse to the active negotiation of meaning with the writer or the speaker.
Since the Interpretive Mode does not allow for active negotiation between the reader and the writer or the listener and the speaker, it requires a much more profound knowledge of the culture from the outset. The more one knows about the other language and culture, the greater the chances of creating the appropriate cultural interpretation of a written or spoken text. It must be noted, however, that cultural literacy and the ability to read or listen between the lines are developed over time and through exposure to the language and culture.”*

1.2 Students will understand and interpret writing and speech on a variety of topics in the target language.

By the end of grade 2 students will:


a. Understand and respond to simple routine oral directions and instructions related to daily classroom activities.

b. Understand and respond to simple requests in various familiar settings (playground, school, home, public places, etc.).

c. Recognize people, objects, monuments, and places based on oral descriptions.

d. Comprehend main events and identify main characters in illustrated children’s stories or stories presented orally with visuals.


By the end of grade 5 students will:


a. Comprehend main ideas and identify main characters and events in age-appropriate narratives based on familiar themes or stories, such as personal anecdotes, familiar fairy tales and texts from children’s literature.

b. Recognize people and objects found in their own or different environments through structured oral and written descriptions.

c. Comprehend brief written messages and short personal notes on familiar topics such as family, school events, and celebrations.

d. Comprehend the main ideas in media such as illustrated texts, posters, advertisements, Internet websites, etc.

e. Interpret gestures, intonation, and other visual or auditory clues appropriately (videos, films, television programs, etc.).

By the end of grade 8 students will:


a. Understand written and oral announcements and messages connected to daily activities in the target cultures.

b. Understand the main themes and significant details from audio/visual products of the cultures as presented on television, radio, and video or live presentations, Internet websites, etc.

c. Understand the main themes and significant details from written products of the target cultures as found in literature, newspapers, magazines, Internet sites and applications, or other authentic sources used by speakers of the target language.

By the end of grade 12 students will:


a. Comprehend main ideas of unfamiliar written and oral resources from various media.

b. Understand the main ideas and significant details of authentic live and recorded discussions, lectures, and presentations on current or past events from the target cultures.

c. Understand the main ideas of nonfiction articles and primary source documents.

d. Analyze target language literary works orally and/or in writing.

e. Understand the cultural nuances of meaning in written and spoken language, as expressed by speakers of the language in formal and informal settings.

f. Understand the cultural nuances of meaning in expressive products of the culture, including selections from various literary genres and the visual arts.

The Presentational Mode:
“The Presentational Mode refers to the creation of messages in a manner that facilitates interpretation by members of the other culture where no direct opportunity for the active negotiation of meaning between members of the two cultures exists. Examples include the writing of reports and articles and the presentation of speeches. These examples of “one-way” writing and speaking require a substantial knowledge of language and culture from the outset, since the goal is to make sure that members of the other culture, the audience, will be successful in reading and listening between the lines.”*

1.3 Students will present information, concepts, and ideas to listeners and/or readers on a variety of topics in the language studied.

By the end of grade 2 students will:


a. Sing simple songs from the target cultures.

b. Perform poems, songs, dances, short skits, simple plays etc.

c. Give show-and-tell presentations.

d. Produce and present illustrated stories, posters, and age-appropriate reports.

By the end of grade 5 students will:


a. Write short messages, post cards, and letters using culturally appropriate format and style.

b. Deliver short oral messages or written reports and exchange information with another language class, either locally or at a distance.

c. Dramatize songs, share anecdotes, or recite poetry commonly known by peers in the cultures studied.

d. Tell or retell stories, orally or in writing.

e. Produce and present audio- or video-recorded announcements, posters, advertisements, skits and short plays.

f. Read aloud with appropriate intonation and pronunciation.

By the end of grade 8 students will:


a. Write short, well-organized compositions on age-appropriate topics of interest.

b. Write personal letters using culturally appropriate format and style.

c. Read aloud with appropriate intonation and pronunciation.

d. Perform short plays, songs and skits, recite selected poems and anecdotes in the target language.

e. Create and present posters, videos, PowerPoint presentations, or reports about age-appropriate personal or cultural themes.

f. Present opinions, preferences, and feelings about current or historical events, cultural experiences, etc.

g. Prepare an oral or written summary of the plot and characters from age-appropriate literature.

By the end of grade 12 students will:


a. Write organized and original compositions, journal entries and reports, and produce various media presentations on a variety of topics.

b. Write various types of texts reflective of the rhetorical styles and devises authentic to the language.

c. Prepare and deliver oral presentations, such as speeches and debates, on various topics.

d. Perform scenes from plays; recite poems or excerpts from literature commonly read by speakers of the target language.

e. Create stories, poems, short plays, or skits based on themes, ideas, and perspectives from the target cultures.

f. Summarize articles or documentaries intended for native speakers of the target language and discuss the topics orally or in writing in the target language.

g. Prepare and present a research-based analysis of current events from multiple perspectives.

Comparisons to One’s Native Language
"This standard focuses on the impact that learning the linguistic elements in the new language has on students’ ability to examine their own language, and to develop hypotheses about the structure and use of languages.

There is a generally held notion that students are better able to reflect on their first language and culture after having experienced a second. Evidence of this notion arises in various studies done on the effects of learning multiple languages. By struggling with how to express particular meanings in a second language, how to encode them linguistically, and how to be sensitive to norms of politeness in another culture, students gain awareness of the nature of language itself.”*

1.4 Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the target language and their own language or dialect.

By the end of grade 2 students will:

a. Recognize differences between the writing systems of the target language and their own.

b. Recognize differences between the sound systems of the target language and their own language or dialect.

c. Recognize simple similarities and differences in the language systems.

By the end of grade 5 students will:

a. Cite and use examples of borrowed words and cognates in the target language compared to the borrowed words in their own and understand why languages in general might need to borrow words.

b. Understand how cognates can enhance comprehension of spoken and written language.

c. Identify idiomatic expressions that are commonly used in their native language and in the target language and use them appropriately.

d. Identify and use formal and informal forms of language, and expressions of politeness in other languages and their own language or dialect.

e. Compare and contrast the sound and writing systems of their own language or dialect and the target language.

f. Understand that languages have different grammatical syntactical functions.

g. Demonstrate awareness that some phrases and idioms do not translate directly from one language to another.

By the end of grade 8 students will:


a. Understand the necessary grammatical and syntactical functions in languages, and use them in the target language.

b. Discuss the relationships among languages, based on students’ awareness of cognates.
c. Recognize differences in language register.

d. Recognize differences in pronunciation systems among languages, and understand that languages have critical sound distinctions that must be mastered in order to communicate meaning.

e. Compare and contrast the writing system of the target language and their own and describe the nature of those writing systems (e.g., logographic, syllabic, alphabetic).

By the end of grade 12 students will:


a. Compare nuances of meaning of words, idioms, and vocal inflections in the target language and their own.

b. Apply knowledge of sound-symbol correspondence, stress, and intonation patterns in spontaneous communicative situations.

c. Understand how the elements of a language may reflect the ways in which people organize information and view the world.

2.
CULTURES

“The term ‘culture’ is generally understood to include the philosophical perspectives, the behavioral practices, and the products – both tangible and intangible – of a society. Because language is the primary vehicle for expressing cultural perspectives and participating in social practices, the study of language provides opportunities for students to develop insights into a culture that are available in no other way. In reality then, the true content of the foreign language course is not the grammar and the vocabulary of the language, but the cultures expressed through the language. It is important that students become skilled observers and analysts of other cultures.”*

2.1 Students will demonstrate an understanding of the practices and perspectives of the cultures studied and the relationship between them.

“This standard focuses on the practices that are derived from the traditional ideas, attitudes and values (perspectives) of a culture. “Cultural practices” refers to patterns of behavior accepted by society and deals with aspects of culture such as rites of passage, the use of forms of discourse, the social “pecking order,” and the use of space. It is important to understand the relationship between these practices and the underlying perspectives that represent the culture’s view of the world.”*

By the end of grade 2 students will:


a. Identify and use patterns of behaviors and interaction in basic familiar settings.

b. Make and respond to culturally appropriate introductions and understand polite requests.

c. Use culturally appropriate courtesy expressions.

d. Participate in age-appropriate cultural activities, games and songs.

By the end of grade 5 students will:


a. Identify customs that are of interest to children (celebrations, traditional foods, aspects of family life, social interaction, and religious practices).

b. Identify simple patterns of behavior, interactions, and customs in various familiar settings.

c. Understand and use appropriate gestures and oral expressions in language and in the target cultures.

d. Perform age-appropriate cultural activities, such as games, songs, birthday celebrations, storytelling, and dramatizations in the target language.

e. Identify commonly held stereotypes about the target culture.

By the end of grade 8 students will:


a. Analyze and explain formal and informal patterns of behavior and cultural practices of the target cultures.

b. Use and understand the meaning of appropriate verbal and nonverbal behavior for daily activities among peers and adults in the target language and cultures.

c. Recognize the diversity of social customs in the target cultures, based on their various historical events, geographical features, and religious beliefs.

d. Discuss stereotypical images associated with the target cultures.

By the end of grade 12 students will:


a. Explain social and geographic factors that inform cultural practices.

b. Identify, analyze, and discuss patterns of behavior in and between various subgroups that comprise the target culture.

c. Adjust speech and behavior appropriately to the situation and audience.

d. Identify differences in cultural practices among same-language cultures.

e. Analyze aspects of the political, legal, and economic systems and practices in the target culture countries, and discuss the factors that influenced the development of these systems.

f. Discuss social issues in the various target culture communities, and examine their impact on the behavioral patterns of individuals, families, and communities.

g. Analyze generalizations and stereotypes of the target culture.

2.2 Students will demonstrate an understanding of the products and perspectives of the cultures studied and the relationship between them.

“This standard focuses on the products of the culture studied and how they reflect the perspectives of that culture. Products may be tangible (e.g., a painting, a cathedral, a piece of literature, a pair of chopsticks) or intangible (e.g., an oral tale, a dance, a sacred ritual, a system of education). Whatever the form of the product, its presence within the culture is required or justified by the underlying beliefs and values (perspectives) of that culture, and the cultural practices involve the use of that product.”*

By the end of grade 2 students will:


a. Identify some major products of the target culture (e.g. gestures, toys, clothing, foods, dwellings, artifacts, flags, music, dance, modes of transportation, places, monuments, calendar, numeracy, etc.).

b. Be familiar with a few well-known children’s stories of the target culture.

By the end of grade 5 students will:


a. Identify and describe cultural products, e.g., toys, clothing, types of dwellings, foods, places, monuments, architecture, etc.

b. Identify the different environments of the target cultures, and examine the impact of these environments on the lifestyles of the target communities.

c. Identify and discuss commonly held stereotypes about products of the target culture.

By the end of grade 8 students will:


a. Identify and explain the function of everyday products in homes and communities of the target culture (e.g., sports equipment, household items, tools, foods, and clothing).

b. Identify and describe how products reflect the lifestyle of people in various communities.

c. Produce and respond to forms of various products of the target cultures such as music, dance, crafts, art, fashion, and cuisine.

d. Become familiar with target language and culture of Internet sites, as well as multimedia educational and recreational games.

By the end of grade 12 students will:


a. Analyze the role of various social institutions of the culture studied, such as religious institutions, clubs, and organizations and analyze how they reflect the values of the target language communities.

b. Analyze expressive products of the culture, including selections from various literary genres, art, architecture, music, cinema, and theater.

c. Identify, analyze, and evaluate the relationship between ideas and perspectives of the cultures studied and their literary and artistic products.

d. Demonstrate knowledge of some of the major literary and artistic movements within identified cultures where the target language is spoken.

e. Hypothesize about the global influence of historical and current events, political structures, value systems, scientific discoveries, and artistic expressions from the target cultures.

Comparisons to One’s Native Culture(s)

2.3 Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons of the target cultures and their own.
“As students expand their knowledge of cultures through language learning, they continually discover perspectives, practices and products that are similar to and different from those in their own culture. They develop the ability to hypothesize about cultural systems in general. Some students may make these comparisons naturally, others learn to do so. This standard helps focus this reflective process for all students by encouraging integration of this process into instruction from the earliest levels of learning.”*

By the end of grade 2 students will:

a. Recognize common interests and practices of the target cultures and students’ own.

b. Compare daily living patterns and behaviors.

c. Compare cultural tangible products (toys, clothing, food, dwelling…).

d. Compare intangible products of culture (children’s songs, games, literature, celebrations, etc.).

By the end of grade 5 students will:


a. Compare and contrast simple patterns of behavior or interaction in various settings in the cultures studied and their own.

b. Compare and contrast gestures and their meaning in the target cultures and their own.

c. Compare and contrast material products (e.g., toys, sports equipment, or food) of the cultures studied and their own.

d. Compare intangible products (e.g., rhymes, songs, or folktales) of the cultures studied and their own.

e. Identify and compare cultural stereotyping in the target culture and one’s own.

By the end of grade 8 students will:

a. Compare and contrast verbal and nonverbal behavior within particular activities in the target cultures and their own.

b. Identify, compare and contrast the cultural features of daily life, customs, and the arts.

c. Explain the relative importance of various products originating in the target culture and compare to one’s own culture.

d. Identify contributions of the target cultures to one’s own and vice versa.

By the end of grade 12 students will:

a. Hypothesize about the origins of idioms as a reflection of the target culture and one’s own.

b. Apply appropriate verbal and non-verbal behavior in a variety of social contexts in the target cultures.

c. Analyze and infer cross-cultural similarities and differences as observed in practices, perspectives, expressive products, and literary genres of the target cultures and students’ own cultures.

d. Hypothesize about reasons behind similarities and differences between the target cultures and the students’ own culture.

e. Analyze and contrast the historical as well as present-day contributions of the target culture to the world-at-large with those of the students’ own cultures.

3.
CONNECTIONS

“Knowledge of a second language and culture combines with the study of other disciplines and shifts the focus from language acquisition to broader learning experiences for the student. Language used in this way helps students integrate the contributions from any discipline into a holistic and ever-expanding open system.”*

3.1 Students will use the foreign language to reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines.

Learning today is no longer restricted to a specific discipline; it has become interdisciplinary. Just as reading cannot be limited to a particular segment of the school day but is central to all aspects of school curriculum, so, too, can foreign language build upon the knowledge that students acquire in other subject areas. When integrated into the broader curriculum, foreign language contributes to the entire educational experience of students.*

By the end of grade 2 students will:

a. Use information and skills from other school subjects in target language activities.

b. Recognize topics related to the target language and culture in other school subjects studied and in related field trips for science, art, social studies, etc.

By the end of grade 5 students will:

a. Study a variety of content topics in the target language.

b. Use skills such as calculation, problem solving, map reading etc. in the target language.

c. Integrate products of the target culture to other school subjects (technology skills, music, songs, arts, games, etc.).

By the end of grade 8 students will:

a. Use the target language to comprehend, elaborate on, and discuss topics from other school subjects.

b. Use the target language to present written and oral reports on topics studied in other disciplines, and vice versa.

c. Use composition strategies, mathematics and technology skills, and other concepts learned in other classes in the target language classes and activities.

By the end of grade 12 students will:

a. Analyze topics from other school subjects in the target language for example, current events, political and historical concepts, worldwide health issues, and environmental concerns.

b. Integrate and apply skills from other disciplines, including technology, to the target language classroom and activities.

c. Correlate knowledge and understanding of global trends to the study of the contemporary target culture.

d. Investigate target language resources, including the Internet, in order to analyze and synthesize information for use in other disciplines.


3.2 Students will understand and appreciate the elements of language and culture studied that can only be comprehended in the target language and its culture(s).

“As a consequence of learning another language and gaining access to its unique means of communication and ways of thinking, students acquire new information and perspectives. As learners of a foreign language, they broaden the source of information available to them. They have a “new window on the world.”*

By the end of grade 2 students will:

a. Listen to, watch, and ask/answer questions about age-appropriate folktales, picture stories, poems, songs, advertisements, cartoons, films, artifacts, and other authentic materials.

By the end of grade 5 students will:

a. Understand simple words and ideas that can only be grasped through original language sources and cultural activities.

By the end of grade 8 students will:

a. Understand ideas and viewpoints that can only be explained in terms of the original language and culture.

b. Begin to research and access authentic sources from the target cultures through interviews, and field trips.

By the end of grade 12 students will:

a. Understand the relationships between untranslatable concepts and words (or phrases) and why they have arisen from the language and culture studied.

b. Appropriately use untranslatable concepts and words (or phrases).

c. Analyze, synthesize, compare, and contrast information collected from multiple perspective and multiple authentic sources.

d. Participate in discussions, forums, interviews and other authentic exchanges within target language communities.

4.
COMMUNITIES

“Recognizing the need for a productive and competitive work force, many schools are emphasizing a curriculum that better prepares students for the school-to-work or the school-to-college transition. These educational efforts extend to the language classroom, preparing competent and self-confident students for work in the multilingual communities around the globe.”*

4.1 Students use the language both within and beyond the school setting.

This standard focuses on language as a tool for communication with speakers of the language throughout one’s life.

By the end of grade 2 students will:

a. Interact in the target language with families, friends or peers, and native speakers.

b. Use target language inside and outside the class to communicate information on topics of interest.


By the end of grade 5 students will:

a. Use the target language within the local community and in authentic sources (newspapers, Internet, etc.).

b. Practice oral or written use of the target language with family, friends, peers, pen pals; and during after school activities, field trips, school exchanges, etc.

By the end of grade 8 students will:

a. Use the target language orally or in writing with family, friends, peers, or pen pals.

b. Participate in school or community events related to the target language or cultures (parent nights, in house festivals, field trips and school exchanges).

c. Identify authentic community resources and contact people useful for research in the target language or about the target cultures.

d. Participate in after-school activities related to the target language and cultures.

By the end of grade 12 students will:

a. Communicate orally or in writing with members of the target cultures on a variety of personal interest, community, or world concerns.

b. Perform authentic tasks using the target language and knowledge of the target cultures in the community or abroad (interviews, problem solving challenges, community service actions, etc.).

c. Research and organize events or celebrations representing the target cultures for the school or the larger community.

4.2 Students show evidence of becoming life-long language learners.
Language is an avenue to information, interpersonal relations, international understanding, and careers in an increasingly global environment. Students who study and use a language over a long period of time: improve their cognitive abilities; can more fully use their capacity in the target language; increase their abilities to learn additional languages; increase their understanding of their own mother tongue and culture; enhance their ability to interact with others; expand their ability to understand other cultures; and enrich their choice of professions.

By the end of grade 2 students will:

a. Articulate their likes and dislikes for a selection of target culture activities and products.

b. Select authentic audio visual materials and computer software for enjoyment.

c. Participate in target culture games or arts during breaks, after school, for talent shows, etc.

By the end of grade 5 students will:


a. Explain their interests in various aspects of the target cultures in the community and around the world.

b. Research aspects of the target cultures in a variety of media sources.

c. Explain the positive aspects of learning a language.

d. Use the target language for enjoyment (e.g., television programs, films, video and computer games, age-appropriate magazines and books).

By the end of grade 8 students will:

a. Develop language skills and cultural insights by using the target language outside the school setting with friends or neighbors, in sports or arts clubs, during travels, etc.

b. Meet basic needs in a target language environment

c. Use target language for enjoyment (television programs, films, video and computer games, age-appropriate magazines and books).

By the end of grade 12 students will:

a. Maintain ongoing personal interaction and contacts with native speakers of the target language through correspondence and travel, and participation in clubs and associations.

b. Express interest for learning a language and justify why it is important.

c. Use the target language to explain how the study of language over a long period of time is transformative.

d. Read for enjoyment target language literature, fiction and non-fiction sources.


*These definitions appeared in:
Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century
National Standards in Foreign Language Education Project
1999
Allen Press, Inc
Lawrence, KS

**Internet Resources
www.foreignlanguage.org
www.actfl.org
www.frenchteachers.org
www.languagepolicy.org
www.cilt.org.uk
www.cal.org

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